Integration tests, part 2 (notes on Cucumber and Selenium)

(This is part 2, some learnings a few weeks into the project described here: Integration tests = secucbootCucumber + Selenium + Spring Boot)

Selenium tricks:

Use the fluent wait instead of anything else, like here waiting for the expected messages to appear. Continue reading

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Integration tests = Cucumber + Selenium + Spring Boot

Let’s say you had this web application with nice unit tests covering the backend calculations, where people keep calling wrong calculations from the frontend. Microservices or not, it happens, so you’ll need proper integration testing. Let’s say the integration testing is a well documented but tedious two days job of clicking around. Understandably, everybody does their best to avoid it…

My answer was: how about we rewrite the integration test scenarios in the Gherkin almost-human-readable language, so we can use Cucumber to run them automated, simulating with Selenium the user browser actions! The supporting stack will be Java and Spring, actually Spring Boot, because you know all I have is a hammer….

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Automated AWS provisioning with Fabric

One of these days I decided to give a try to an opensource project which happens to run only on Linux. This sounds like nothing special unless your development machine happens to be Windows 7 and you don’t want to bother with downloading and maintaining virtual images. True, Vagrant would be a good option but getting it (and VirtualBox) to work with my enterprise-grade proxy access is a real PITA. Add to that the less-than-maintained vagrant-proxyconf plugin and the zillions of tools every one with own config files for proxies (gradle, git, maven, you-name-it)… Not at least, a local virtual machine is local and we’re heading to a cloud-based society right? So, AWS to go! Continue reading

Migrating emails from Notes to Outlook (or, programming for failure)

My huge archive of Lotus Notes emails started almost ten years back, and I stubbornly kept most of it around because of why not. Now that I use Outlook 2013 you can imagine I would have liked to have all of them also in my brand new email client. One sure could get some commercial software to do it, but why shouldn’t I try converting them myself? I mean, look, a simple drag and drop from Notes creates in Windows Explorer EML files and we all know EML is a very much standard format (RFC822 or so). Or at least that’s what I thought – Outlook 2013 thinks differently and will not import EML files. Only Outlook Express or Microsoft Live Mail can do that, but who cares about these anyway?? So what are my options?

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SoCraTes day in Zurich, 2015

Last Friday I attended the “Software Craftsmanship and Testing” conference. I said “last Friday” because it lasted only one day, unlike the typical 3 days format (including night stays)… but for me it was just enough, I cannot really afford the extended versions. This event brought together about 50 folks with all possible backgrounds – developers .net, Java, JS, but also devops people… really, everything. The “unconference” format meant at the beginning whoever wanted to propose topics did so by placing a note on the schedule table, and explained in a few words what his discussion topic is. Continue reading

Battle For The Net


If you woke up tomorrow, and your internet looked like this, what would you do? Imagine all your favorite websites taking forever to load, while you get annoying notifications from your ISP suggesting you switch to one of their approved “Fast Lane” sites. Think about what we would lose: all the weird, alternative, interesting, and enlightening stuff that makes the Internet so much cooler than mainstream Cable TV. What if the only news sites you could reliably connect to were the ones that had deals with companies like Comcast and Verizon? On September 10th, just a few days before the FCC’s comment deadline, public interest organizations are issuing an open, international call for websites and internet users to unite for an “Internet Slowdown” to show the world what the web would be like if Team Cable gets their way and trashes net neutrality. Net neutrality is hard to explain, so our hope is that this action will help SHOW the world what’s really at stake if we lose the open Internet.If you’ve got a website, blog or tumblr, get the code to join the #InternetSlowdown here: https://battleforthenet.com/sept10th Everyone else, here’s a quick list of things you can do to help spread the word about the slowdown: http://tumblr.fightforthefuture.org/post/96020972118/be-a-part-of-the-great-internet-slowdown Get creative! Don’t let us tell you what to do. See you on the net September 10th!

via Battle For The Net.

How simple is simple? (from MongoDB to Elasticsearch)

IT must be easy, oh yeah. After years of courses and university and everything else, just because they were put together by the brightest educational minds you should be able in a second to program this new web application, integrate external web services, add a new GUI and adapt your friend’s broken Excel import, all while cleaning up grandma’s computer for the hundredth time. Even kids are to be taught programming, so it can’t be much in it right? How MANY times I heard this told in various ways “it can’t be so difficult”… Everybody has challenging jobs but as soon these involve computers everything should become a breeze, somehow. When did we get into this???

Trouble

But I digress. So, first a bit of context: I thought it would be big time I followed my own thinking from a month ago (see “Proof of concept, with a concept”) and actually migrate the proof of concept code from “Ractive.js and vert.x integration over the event bus” to use Elasticsearch. Continue reading