Proof of concept, with a concept

One problem I have when trying new technologies is actually seeing them in realistic situations – which translates to having a real use case for them. Think about this: when you build a “hello world” application you actually couldn’t be further away from the real world! I guess that’s why nobody calls it “hello real world” anyway… The whole experience you get from the proof of concept is just random installation trivia if you’re not using it to prove a point. That’s why it’s called “proof of concept” – it should have a concept, silly. Continue reading

Augmented reality seen the wrong way around (but done right)

There comes Epson with a new edition of their Moverio BT-200 – AR glasses, augmented reality that is. They look like a normal pair of dorky glasses like I see lots in the commuter train, on which tiny projectors display from the inside semi-transparent images.

(photo Gizmag)
(photo Gizmag)

Not huge new concept, even Garmin does the same for your front-shield window with their head-up projector. The Epson device however embeds gyroscopes and whatever else to properly track your reality, and augment it. No, I didn’t try it yet but I’d love to, and certainly NOT based on the dumb reviews I can read all over the net. Why dumb? Continue reading

Ractive.js and vert.x integration over the event bus

Recently I ran into Ractive.js which seemed like something doing exactly what I’d expect from a client side (browser that is) framework – fetch its own data and create nice web pages with that without getting me from the beginning too deep into JavaScript programming. Nota bene: I’m not a JS programmer and Angular or Ember just scare the s* out of me, plus I have strong moderate opinions against massive JavaScript framework programming so Ractive seemed like a convenient compromise. But would I be able to use it? In a vert.x project? Maybe I should try just that… Continue reading

Switching web programming paradigms with vert.x

When I first combined the Internet and programming it was the second half of the 90’s and all I knew was Java applets. Oh, there was also CGI but I somehow managed to skip over it. The approach was then quite natural: write small programs which will run in the browser and grab data from other programs – run in either other browsers or on the server. Or on other servers. I’m not saying the idea was easy and I only got that far before I moved on to other professional areas. Later when I came back to the web, things had settled differently: you had a servlet specification, a multitiered application to support them, big servers and everything was clear. Of course there was some bit of fight over technologies, gradual improvements here and there but the model was there already. Continue reading

Want a successful distributed Scrum team? Hire Chuck Norris.

A little time ago I went to an evening seminar thing, where a local company presented their successful Scrum way of working. They had also Jeff Sutherland invited, right, THAT Jeff! How could I miss the opportunity? So there I was and I must say it was pretty thought provoking. Let me add a bit of context: the doubt I brought with me to the event was that, well, we know the agile manifesto is saying to put people over processes but what on earth can you do when those ideal people are not with you? Even more, I somehow remembered everybody claiming agile was about having people clustered together, now Jeff was condoning with his simple presence something radically different… a must see event yet again. Continue reading