Building Quarkus native images. You can do it too!

If you read the Quarkus native build page, it should be a breeze: enable -Pnative and there we go! Well… not so fast. Not so fast at all, as they recognize in another “Quarkus native tips” page, unfortunately not linked from the first one (so good luck googling for it). And boy do you need those tips…

I had this application happily running for months and while at the beginning there were some recognized issues with native generation on Windows, nowadays the general expectation was it should work. So I updated all dependencies and started a painful three days long trip, but hey no pain no gain right?

Here’s what it required:

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How simple is simple? (from MongoDB to Elasticsearch)

IT must be easy, oh yeah. After years of courses and university and everything else, just because they were put together by the brightest educational minds you should be able in a second to program this new web application, integrate external web services, add a new GUI and adapt your friend’s broken Excel import, all while cleaning up grandma’s computer for the hundredth time. Even kids are to be taught programming, so it can’t be much in it right? How MANY times I heard this told in various ways “it can’t be so difficult”… Everybody has challenging jobs but as soon these involve computers everything should become a breeze, somehow. When did we get into this???

Trouble

But I digress. So, first a bit of context: I thought it would be big time I followed my own thinking from a month ago (see “Proof of concept, with a concept”) and actually migrate the proof of concept code from “Ractive.js and vert.x integration over the event bus” to use Elasticsearch. Continue reading

Proof of concept, with a concept

One problem I have when trying new technologies is actually seeing them in realistic situations – which translates to having a real use case for them. Think about this: when you build a “hello world” application you actually couldn’t be further away from the real world! I guess that’s why nobody calls it “hello real world” anyway… The whole experience you get from the proof of concept is just random installation trivia if you’re not using it to prove a point. That’s why it’s called “proof of concept” – it should have a concept, silly. Continue reading