SoCraTes day in Zurich, 2015

Last Friday I attended the “Software Craftsmanship and Testing” conference. I said “last Friday” because it lasted only one day, unlike the typical 3 days format (including night stays)… but for me it was just enough, I cannot really afford the extended versions. This event brought together about 50 folks with all possible backgrounds – developers .net, Java, JS, but also devops people… really, everything. The “unconference” format meant at the beginning whoever wanted to propose topics did so by placing a note on the schedule table, and explained in a few words what his discussion topic is. Continue reading

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Battle For The Net


If you woke up tomorrow, and your internet looked like this, what would you do? Imagine all your favorite websites taking forever to load, while you get annoying notifications from your ISP suggesting you switch to one of their approved “Fast Lane” sites. Think about what we would lose: all the weird, alternative, interesting, and enlightening stuff that makes the Internet so much cooler than mainstream Cable TV. What if the only news sites you could reliably connect to were the ones that had deals with companies like Comcast and Verizon? On September 10th, just a few days before the FCC’s comment deadline, public interest organizations are issuing an open, international call for websites and internet users to unite for an “Internet Slowdown” to show the world what the web would be like if Team Cable gets their way and trashes net neutrality. Net neutrality is hard to explain, so our hope is that this action will help SHOW the world what’s really at stake if we lose the open Internet.If you’ve got a website, blog or tumblr, get the code to join the #InternetSlowdown here: https://battleforthenet.com/sept10th Everyone else, here’s a quick list of things you can do to help spread the word about the slowdown: http://tumblr.fightforthefuture.org/post/96020972118/be-a-part-of-the-great-internet-slowdown Get creative! Don’t let us tell you what to do. See you on the net September 10th!

via Battle For The Net.

How simple is simple? (from MongoDB to Elasticsearch)

IT must be easy, oh yeah. After years of courses and university and everything else, just because they were put together by the brightest educational minds you should be able in a second to program this new web application, integrate external web services, add a new GUI and adapt your friend’s broken Excel import, all while cleaning up grandma’s computer for the hundredth time. Even kids are to be taught programming, so it can’t be much in it right? How MANY times I heard this told in various ways “it can’t be so difficult”… Everybody has challenging jobs but as soon these involve computers everything should become a breeze, somehow. When did we get into this???

Trouble

But I digress. So, first a bit of context: I thought it would be big time I followed my own thinking from a month ago (see “Proof of concept, with a concept”) and actually migrate the proof of concept code from “Ractive.js and vert.x integration over the event bus” to use Elasticsearch. Continue reading

Proof of concept, with a concept

One problem I have when trying new technologies is actually seeing them in realistic situations – which translates to having a real use case for them. Think about this: when you build a “hello world” application you actually couldn’t be further away from the real world! I guess that’s why nobody calls it “hello real world” anyway… The whole experience you get from the proof of concept is just random installation trivia if you’re not using it to prove a point. That’s why it’s called “proof of concept” – it should have a concept, silly. Continue reading

Augmented reality seen the wrong way around (but done right)

There comes Epson with a new edition of their Moverio BT-200 – AR glasses, augmented reality that is. They look like a normal pair of dorky glasses like I see lots in the commuter train, on which tiny projectors display from the inside semi-transparent images.

(photo Gizmag)
(photo Gizmag)

Not huge new concept, even Garmin does the same for your front-shield window with their head-up projector. The Epson device however embeds gyroscopes and whatever else to properly track your reality, and augment it. No, I didn’t try it yet but I’d love to, and certainly NOT based on the dumb reviews I can read all over the net. Why dumb? Continue reading

Ractive.js and vert.x integration over the event bus

Recently I ran into Ractive.js which seemed like something doing exactly what I’d expect from a client side (browser that is) framework – fetch its own data and create nice web pages with that without getting me from the beginning too deep into JavaScript programming. Nota bene: I’m not a JS programmer and Angular or Ember just scare the s* out of me, plus I have strong moderate opinions against massive JavaScript framework programming so Ractive seemed like a convenient compromise. But would I be able to use it? In a vert.x project? Maybe I should try just that… Continue reading